About - langellphotography

Lisa Langell

Professional photographer

"Great photography shouldn't just document what you saw...it should capture how you experienced the moment!"

--Lisa Langell

An Interview with Photographer, Lisa Langell:

Who initially influenced you to enjoy and appreciate nature?

"I grew into an avid birdwatcher at the impressionable age of eight. It was a passion introduced to me by my great aunt Josephine, who cultivated and nurtered it while I spent time with her each spring. Josephine (Langell) James, 'Aunt Jo,' was a woman well ahead of her time. She always maintained the perfect sense of perspective, practicality, persistance and place that made her one of the most respected and admired women I have ever known. Her concern and appreciation for nature continued throughout her 102 years on earth. She is a big part of who I am today. In fact, I have dedicated my first published book of photography, 'The Nature of Things,' to her memory."

How has your love of nature translated into photography?

"Over time, my enjoyment of bird watching expanded into a genuine passion for photographing wildlife and the natural world. My specific interest in wildlife photography evolved even more so during my teenage years when I first began visiting migratory hotspots such as Point Pelee,Ontario, Canada; Whitefish Point, Michigan, and Maumee Valley, Ohio, where I could observe migrating birds by the thousands. It was at those places where I became enamored by "the birders with the long lenses" who tirelessly worked to photograph 'the perfect shot! By age 14, I was hooked."

When did you receive your first "big" camera? "

I initially used a Kodak Instamatic film camera, then later a Minolta 110mm point-and-shoot film camera when I was around 8 years of age. As my interest developed, I received my first 35mm film camera, a Canon A-1, from my mother as a holiday gift when I was about 14 years old.

Soon after, I set off with my passion of capturing the natural world on film. I chuckle now when I think back to my early images of birds and wildlife. They were far from being tack-sharp, frame-filling works of art. Still, I did not give up. Dissatisfied with merely images of scenics or wildlife that made 'nice documentation shots,' I eagerly sought to do better. I knew I needed to do so much more--even at a young age. I still feel that way."

How would you describe the current style of your work?

"I have always been compelled to discover and capture those elusive, split-second moments that translate into one-of-a-kind, evocative images. That desire, for me, is absolutely inextinguishable. The purpose I breath into my artwork is to not simply document the natural world, but to interpret it into meaningful moments that range from expressions of tranquility through to the powerful and most provocative of moments. I always seek to create images that produce both a visual and emotional connection for the viewer. As those rare, fleeting moments transpire in front of my lens, I tenaciously work to artfully capture them through my lens."

How would you describe the joy you find in photography?

"The joy--rather, euphoria--that I find in photographing moments in nature happens at lest twice for every successful image. Initially, it occurs in the field with my camera, where I can completely lose my sense of time and immerse myself and my lens in the world around me. However, photographs are akin to a visual language--they speak out only when shared. My second wave of joy occurs when my work communicates emotion and moments to all who take a moment to look and listen. I feel so lucky that my images have opportunities to communicate to people daily."

How does your photography impact nature?

"Our environment is changing rapidly. Many plants and animals are finding it difficult to adjust and survive. As such, it is even more important that we work to preserve, respect, and appreciate the forces that work in harmony to produce the species that give all of us so much beauty and diversity. Those species sustain us---quite literally in many cases. As such, I not only seek to capture images of the natural world, but I also donate a percentage of proceeds, artwork, and services annually to various recognized charities and organizations that work ethically to preserve and protect our natural world.

Additionally, I teach nature photography workshops that include required instruction based directly from the North American Nature Photographers Association's Principles of Ethical Field Practices. These guidelines are critical to ensuring photographers remain sensitive to the protection of plants and animals out in the field. 'Leave no trace' is a personal motto and perpetual practice of mine."

Where do you live?

"Formerly from Michigan, I now reside in Arizona."

Any final words? "I wouldn't be successful without those who support what I do. My deepest gratitude goes to all of my customers, fans, and anyone who appreciates, enjoys, and champions my work. You are a vital part of my world and definitely sustain my passion. Their encouragement and support are so very much appreciated. They efforts they make to support me "behind the lens" makes so much of what happens in front of it possible."

--Lisa Langell


North of 49 Photography: Partner and professional workshop leader / instructor
--About this partnership
--Tours and workshops via partnership

Approved Instructor / Workshop leader for:

Photographer's Adventure Club:  Approved professional instruct2ndor and PAC Pro Photographer

Butterfly Wonderland:  Approved instructor

Arizona State Parks - Boyce Thompson Arboretum:  Approved instructor

Arizona Wildlife Federation:  Approved instructor

Arizona Outdoor Woman:  Approved instructor

Honors / Awards:

North American Nature Photographer's Association:
(Contest includes about 2600 images annually)

-2nd Place - Mammals (2015 Showcase competition)  Image

-Top 250 - 2014 Showcase competition Image

-Top 100 - 2014 Showcase competition Image

-Top 250 - 2013 Showcase competition Image

-Professional Photographer's Association (PPA) Loan Collection award (2013) 

National Wildlife Federation:
(Contest includes about 50,000 images annually)
-Top 100 Honorable Mention Image


Ranger Rick Magazine (April 2015)

Arizona Wildlife Views (Front cover) Summer 2014

Arizona Wildlife Views (back cover) Winter 2014

Phoenix Home and Garden Magazine

Sportsman's Channel

Numerous other regional publications locally and internationally

Charity / Volunteer Work

Down Syndrome Network of Arizona

Arizona State Parks - Boyce Thompson Arboretum

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